Albuminuria is an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Japanese population: The Takahata study

Tsuneo Konta, Kosuke Kudo, Hiroko Sato, Kazunobu Ichikawa, Ami Ikeda, Kazuko Suzuki, Atsushi Hirayama, Yoko Shibata, Tetsu Watanabe, Makoto Daimon, Takeo Kato, Yoshiyuki Ueno, Takamasa Kayama, Isao Kubota

研究成果: Article

23 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Background: Albuminuria is a known risk factor for cardiovascular events and premature deaths. However, the association between urinary albumin excretion and mortality is unknown in the Japanese population. To clarify this, we conducted a community-based longitudinal study. Methods: This study included 3,445 registered Japanese subjects (mean age 62.6 years), with a 7-year follow-up. Albuminuria was defined as a urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) ≥30 mg/g in the morning spot urine. Results: Subjects with albuminuria (n = 514, 14.9 %) were older and showed a higher prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes and lower values of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) than those without albuminuria (n = 2931, 85.1 %). During the follow-up, 138 subjects died. A Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that all-cause mortality significantly increased along with the increase in urine albumin excretion (log-rank test, P < 0.001). The subjects with albuminuria showed a significantly higher mortality rate than those without albuminuria (7.4 vs. 3.4 %; log-rank test, P < 0.001). A Cox proportional hazard model analysis after adjusting for possible confounders showed that albuminuria was an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.69, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.12-2.56 and HR 2.27, 95 % CI 1.10-4.70, respectively) but not for noncardiovascular mortality. These associations were preserved after excluding subjects with high ACR (≥300 mg/g). Conclusions: Albuminuria was a risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Japanese population. To detect subjects with a high risk for premature death, measuring urinary albumin excretion might be useful.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)805-810
ページ数6
ジャーナルClinical and Experimental Nephrology
17
発行部数6
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2013 12
外部発表Yes

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Albuminuria
Mortality
Albumins
Population
Premature Mortality
Urine
Creatinine
Confidence Intervals
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Proportional Hazards Models
Longitudinal Studies
Obesity
Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

これを引用

Albuminuria is an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Japanese population : The Takahata study. / Konta, Tsuneo; Kudo, Kosuke; Sato, Hiroko; Ichikawa, Kazunobu; Ikeda, Ami; Suzuki, Kazuko; Hirayama, Atsushi; Shibata, Yoko; Watanabe, Tetsu; Daimon, Makoto; Kato, Takeo; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Kayama, Takamasa; Kubota, Isao.

:: Clinical and Experimental Nephrology, 巻 17, 番号 6, 12.2013, p. 805-810.

研究成果: Article

Konta, T, Kudo, K, Sato, H, Ichikawa, K, Ikeda, A, Suzuki, K, Hirayama, A, Shibata, Y, Watanabe, T, Daimon, M, Kato, T, Ueno, Y, Kayama, T & Kubota, I 2013, 'Albuminuria is an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Japanese population: The Takahata study', Clinical and Experimental Nephrology, 巻. 17, 番号 6, pp. 805-810. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10157-013-0770-3
Konta, Tsuneo ; Kudo, Kosuke ; Sato, Hiroko ; Ichikawa, Kazunobu ; Ikeda, Ami ; Suzuki, Kazuko ; Hirayama, Atsushi ; Shibata, Yoko ; Watanabe, Tetsu ; Daimon, Makoto ; Kato, Takeo ; Ueno, Yoshiyuki ; Kayama, Takamasa ; Kubota, Isao. / Albuminuria is an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Japanese population : The Takahata study. :: Clinical and Experimental Nephrology. 2013 ; 巻 17, 番号 6. pp. 805-810.
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title = "Albuminuria is an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Japanese population: The Takahata study",
abstract = "Background: Albuminuria is a known risk factor for cardiovascular events and premature deaths. However, the association between urinary albumin excretion and mortality is unknown in the Japanese population. To clarify this, we conducted a community-based longitudinal study. Methods: This study included 3,445 registered Japanese subjects (mean age 62.6 years), with a 7-year follow-up. Albuminuria was defined as a urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) ≥30 mg/g in the morning spot urine. Results: Subjects with albuminuria (n = 514, 14.9 {\%}) were older and showed a higher prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes and lower values of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) than those without albuminuria (n = 2931, 85.1 {\%}). During the follow-up, 138 subjects died. A Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that all-cause mortality significantly increased along with the increase in urine albumin excretion (log-rank test, P < 0.001). The subjects with albuminuria showed a significantly higher mortality rate than those without albuminuria (7.4 vs. 3.4 {\%}; log-rank test, P < 0.001). A Cox proportional hazard model analysis after adjusting for possible confounders showed that albuminuria was an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.69, 95 {\%} confidence interval [CI] 1.12-2.56 and HR 2.27, 95 {\%} CI 1.10-4.70, respectively) but not for noncardiovascular mortality. These associations were preserved after excluding subjects with high ACR (≥300 mg/g). Conclusions: Albuminuria was a risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Japanese population. To detect subjects with a high risk for premature death, measuring urinary albumin excretion might be useful.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Albuminuria is an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Japanese population

T2 - The Takahata study

AU - Konta, Tsuneo

AU - Kudo, Kosuke

AU - Sato, Hiroko

AU - Ichikawa, Kazunobu

AU - Ikeda, Ami

AU - Suzuki, Kazuko

AU - Hirayama, Atsushi

AU - Shibata, Yoko

AU - Watanabe, Tetsu

AU - Daimon, Makoto

AU - Kato, Takeo

AU - Ueno, Yoshiyuki

AU - Kayama, Takamasa

AU - Kubota, Isao

PY - 2013/12

Y1 - 2013/12

N2 - Background: Albuminuria is a known risk factor for cardiovascular events and premature deaths. However, the association between urinary albumin excretion and mortality is unknown in the Japanese population. To clarify this, we conducted a community-based longitudinal study. Methods: This study included 3,445 registered Japanese subjects (mean age 62.6 years), with a 7-year follow-up. Albuminuria was defined as a urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) ≥30 mg/g in the morning spot urine. Results: Subjects with albuminuria (n = 514, 14.9 %) were older and showed a higher prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes and lower values of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) than those without albuminuria (n = 2931, 85.1 %). During the follow-up, 138 subjects died. A Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that all-cause mortality significantly increased along with the increase in urine albumin excretion (log-rank test, P < 0.001). The subjects with albuminuria showed a significantly higher mortality rate than those without albuminuria (7.4 vs. 3.4 %; log-rank test, P < 0.001). A Cox proportional hazard model analysis after adjusting for possible confounders showed that albuminuria was an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.69, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.12-2.56 and HR 2.27, 95 % CI 1.10-4.70, respectively) but not for noncardiovascular mortality. These associations were preserved after excluding subjects with high ACR (≥300 mg/g). Conclusions: Albuminuria was a risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Japanese population. To detect subjects with a high risk for premature death, measuring urinary albumin excretion might be useful.

AB - Background: Albuminuria is a known risk factor for cardiovascular events and premature deaths. However, the association between urinary albumin excretion and mortality is unknown in the Japanese population. To clarify this, we conducted a community-based longitudinal study. Methods: This study included 3,445 registered Japanese subjects (mean age 62.6 years), with a 7-year follow-up. Albuminuria was defined as a urine albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) ≥30 mg/g in the morning spot urine. Results: Subjects with albuminuria (n = 514, 14.9 %) were older and showed a higher prevalence of hypertension, obesity, and diabetes and lower values of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) than those without albuminuria (n = 2931, 85.1 %). During the follow-up, 138 subjects died. A Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that all-cause mortality significantly increased along with the increase in urine albumin excretion (log-rank test, P < 0.001). The subjects with albuminuria showed a significantly higher mortality rate than those without albuminuria (7.4 vs. 3.4 %; log-rank test, P < 0.001). A Cox proportional hazard model analysis after adjusting for possible confounders showed that albuminuria was an independent risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.69, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.12-2.56 and HR 2.27, 95 % CI 1.10-4.70, respectively) but not for noncardiovascular mortality. These associations were preserved after excluding subjects with high ACR (≥300 mg/g). Conclusions: Albuminuria was a risk factor for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in the Japanese population. To detect subjects with a high risk for premature death, measuring urinary albumin excretion might be useful.

KW - Albuminuria

KW - Cohort

KW - Mortality

KW - Population

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