Being conscious of water intake positively associated with sufficient non-alcohol drink intake regardless of seasons and reasons in healthy Japanese; the KOBE study: A cross sectional study

Tomofumi Nishikawa, Naomi Miyamatsu, Aya Higashiyama, Yoshimi Kubota, Yoko Nishida, Takumi Hirata, Daisuke Sugiyama, Kazuyo Kuwabara, Sachimi Kubo, Yoshihiro Miyamoto, Tomonori Okamura

研究成果: Article

抄録

The present study sought to clarify if being conscious of water intake (CWI) is associated with sufficient non-alcohol drink (NAD) intake. We used data of healthy participants without diabetes, aged 40–74 years, in the Kobe Orthopedic and Biomedical Epidemiologic (KOBE) study. The association between being CWI and NAD intake was evaluated by multivariate linear regression analyses after adjusting for age, sex, surveyed months (seasons), alcohol drinking, health-awareness life habits, socioeconomic factors, serum osmolarity, estimated daily salt intake, and reasons for NAD intake. Among 988 (698 women and 290 men) participants eligible for the present analyses, 644 participants (65.2%) were CWI and 344 participants (34.8%) were not CWI (non-CWI). The most popular reason for being CWI was to avoid heat stroke in summer and to prevent ischemic cerebral stroke in winter. The CWI group took more NAD, especially decaffeinated beverages, than the non-CWI group (1846.7 ± 675.1 mL/day vs. 1478.0 ± 636.3 ml/day, p < 0.001). There was a significant association between being CWI and NAD intake in multivariate linear regression analyses ever after adjusting for the relevant variables (β = 318.1, p < 0.001). These findings demonstrated CWI, regardless of the reasons and the seasons, was associated with high NAD intake in Japanese healthy population.

元の言語English
記事番号4151
ジャーナルInternational journal of environmental research and public health
16
発行部数21
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2019 11

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Drinking
Cross-Sectional Studies
Linear Models
Regression Analysis
Heat Stroke
Beverages
Alcohol Drinking
Osmolar Concentration
Habits
Orthopedics
Epidemiologic Studies
Healthy Volunteers
Salts
Stroke
Health
Serum
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

これを引用

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title = "Being conscious of water intake positively associated with sufficient non-alcohol drink intake regardless of seasons and reasons in healthy Japanese; the KOBE study: A cross sectional study",
abstract = "The present study sought to clarify if being conscious of water intake (CWI) is associated with sufficient non-alcohol drink (NAD) intake. We used data of healthy participants without diabetes, aged 40–74 years, in the Kobe Orthopedic and Biomedical Epidemiologic (KOBE) study. The association between being CWI and NAD intake was evaluated by multivariate linear regression analyses after adjusting for age, sex, surveyed months (seasons), alcohol drinking, health-awareness life habits, socioeconomic factors, serum osmolarity, estimated daily salt intake, and reasons for NAD intake. Among 988 (698 women and 290 men) participants eligible for the present analyses, 644 participants (65.2{\%}) were CWI and 344 participants (34.8{\%}) were not CWI (non-CWI). The most popular reason for being CWI was to avoid heat stroke in summer and to prevent ischemic cerebral stroke in winter. The CWI group took more NAD, especially decaffeinated beverages, than the non-CWI group (1846.7 ± 675.1 mL/day vs. 1478.0 ± 636.3 ml/day, p < 0.001). There was a significant association between being CWI and NAD intake in multivariate linear regression analyses ever after adjusting for the relevant variables (β = 318.1, p < 0.001). These findings demonstrated CWI, regardless of the reasons and the seasons, was associated with high NAD intake in Japanese healthy population.",
keywords = "Cross-sectional study, Daily salt intake, Non-alcohol drink, Seasons, Serum osmolarity, Water intake conscious",
author = "Tomofumi Nishikawa and Naomi Miyamatsu and Aya Higashiyama and Yoshimi Kubota and Yoko Nishida and Takumi Hirata and Daisuke Sugiyama and Kazuyo Kuwabara and Sachimi Kubo and Yoshihiro Miyamoto and Tomonori Okamura",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
doi = "10.3390/ijerph16214151",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
journal = "International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health",
issn = "1661-7827",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Being conscious of water intake positively associated with sufficient non-alcohol drink intake regardless of seasons and reasons in healthy Japanese; the KOBE study

T2 - A cross sectional study

AU - Nishikawa, Tomofumi

AU - Miyamatsu, Naomi

AU - Higashiyama, Aya

AU - Kubota, Yoshimi

AU - Nishida, Yoko

AU - Hirata, Takumi

AU - Sugiyama, Daisuke

AU - Kuwabara, Kazuyo

AU - Kubo, Sachimi

AU - Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - The present study sought to clarify if being conscious of water intake (CWI) is associated with sufficient non-alcohol drink (NAD) intake. We used data of healthy participants without diabetes, aged 40–74 years, in the Kobe Orthopedic and Biomedical Epidemiologic (KOBE) study. The association between being CWI and NAD intake was evaluated by multivariate linear regression analyses after adjusting for age, sex, surveyed months (seasons), alcohol drinking, health-awareness life habits, socioeconomic factors, serum osmolarity, estimated daily salt intake, and reasons for NAD intake. Among 988 (698 women and 290 men) participants eligible for the present analyses, 644 participants (65.2%) were CWI and 344 participants (34.8%) were not CWI (non-CWI). The most popular reason for being CWI was to avoid heat stroke in summer and to prevent ischemic cerebral stroke in winter. The CWI group took more NAD, especially decaffeinated beverages, than the non-CWI group (1846.7 ± 675.1 mL/day vs. 1478.0 ± 636.3 ml/day, p < 0.001). There was a significant association between being CWI and NAD intake in multivariate linear regression analyses ever after adjusting for the relevant variables (β = 318.1, p < 0.001). These findings demonstrated CWI, regardless of the reasons and the seasons, was associated with high NAD intake in Japanese healthy population.

AB - The present study sought to clarify if being conscious of water intake (CWI) is associated with sufficient non-alcohol drink (NAD) intake. We used data of healthy participants without diabetes, aged 40–74 years, in the Kobe Orthopedic and Biomedical Epidemiologic (KOBE) study. The association between being CWI and NAD intake was evaluated by multivariate linear regression analyses after adjusting for age, sex, surveyed months (seasons), alcohol drinking, health-awareness life habits, socioeconomic factors, serum osmolarity, estimated daily salt intake, and reasons for NAD intake. Among 988 (698 women and 290 men) participants eligible for the present analyses, 644 participants (65.2%) were CWI and 344 participants (34.8%) were not CWI (non-CWI). The most popular reason for being CWI was to avoid heat stroke in summer and to prevent ischemic cerebral stroke in winter. The CWI group took more NAD, especially decaffeinated beverages, than the non-CWI group (1846.7 ± 675.1 mL/day vs. 1478.0 ± 636.3 ml/day, p < 0.001). There was a significant association between being CWI and NAD intake in multivariate linear regression analyses ever after adjusting for the relevant variables (β = 318.1, p < 0.001). These findings demonstrated CWI, regardless of the reasons and the seasons, was associated with high NAD intake in Japanese healthy population.

KW - Cross-sectional study

KW - Daily salt intake

KW - Non-alcohol drink

KW - Seasons

KW - Serum osmolarity

KW - Water intake conscious

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U2 - 10.3390/ijerph16214151

DO - 10.3390/ijerph16214151

M3 - Article

C2 - 31661872

AN - SCOPUS:85074274081

VL - 16

JO - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

JF - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

SN - 1661-7827

IS - 21

M1 - 4151

ER -