Corrosion response of surface engineered titanium alloys damaged by prior abrasion

Jun Komotori, B. J. Lee, H. Dong, P. A. Dearnley

研究成果: Article

71 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

During use, bio-implant materials like Ti-alloys need to endure and resist corrosion-wear. Here, a synergy between corrosion and wear takes place; wear is increased by the action of corrosion and corrosion is increased by the action of wear. In this paper, the corrosion response of SP700 (Ti-4.5A1-3V-2Fe-2Mo) and Ti-6A1-4V alloys, with and without surface treatments are described. Both kinds of alloy were surface-treated with: (i) an oxygen diffusion hardening process called "thermal oxidation" (TO) and (ii) a TiN coating procedure known as arc ion plating (AIP). The effect of prior mechanical (abrasive) surface damage on corrosion behaviour was simulated by scratching samples using a diamond indenter. A standard potentiodynamic or cyclic polarisation (CP) procedure, was conducted in de-aerated 0.89 wt.% NaCl (physiological saline) controlled at 37°C at a scan rate of 0.167 mV/s, from - 1V Ag/AgCl up to +4 V Ag/AgCl. Results showed that the TO-treated samples offered the best resistance to the sequential actions of mechanical damage (simulated abrasion) and corrosion. This is attributed to the TO-treatment producing a stable oxide layer, for both Ti-alloys, which displayed a superior repassivation rate and adhesive strength compared to untreated and TiN coated Ti-alloys. The TiN coated Ti-alloys were also prone to pitting and blistering during corrosion testing whilst the TO-treated alloys were not affected by blistering. However, the TO-treated Ti-6A1-4V showed evidence of superficial pitting. On balance, the TO-process appears to offer significant future promise for use in bio-implants and other engineering components subjected to corrosive-wear processes.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)1239-1249
ページ数11
ジャーナルWear
250-251
発行部数PART 2
出版物ステータスPublished - 2001 10

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abrasion
titanium alloys
Titanium alloys
Abrasion
corrosion
Corrosion
Oxidation
oxidation
Wear of materials
pitting
Pitting
damage
Caustics
ion plating
Diamond
abrasives
surface treatment
Abrasives
Plating
hardening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

これを引用

Komotori, J., Lee, B. J., Dong, H., & Dearnley, P. A. (2001). Corrosion response of surface engineered titanium alloys damaged by prior abrasion. Wear, 250-251(PART 2), 1239-1249.

Corrosion response of surface engineered titanium alloys damaged by prior abrasion. / Komotori, Jun; Lee, B. J.; Dong, H.; Dearnley, P. A.

:: Wear, 巻 250-251, 番号 PART 2, 10.2001, p. 1239-1249.

研究成果: Article

Komotori, J, Lee, BJ, Dong, H & Dearnley, PA 2001, 'Corrosion response of surface engineered titanium alloys damaged by prior abrasion', Wear, 巻. 250-251, 番号 PART 2, pp. 1239-1249.
Komotori J, Lee BJ, Dong H, Dearnley PA. Corrosion response of surface engineered titanium alloys damaged by prior abrasion. Wear. 2001 10;250-251(PART 2):1239-1249.
Komotori, Jun ; Lee, B. J. ; Dong, H. ; Dearnley, P. A. / Corrosion response of surface engineered titanium alloys damaged by prior abrasion. :: Wear. 2001 ; 巻 250-251, 番号 PART 2. pp. 1239-1249.
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AU - Komotori, Jun

AU - Lee, B. J.

AU - Dong, H.

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N2 - During use, bio-implant materials like Ti-alloys need to endure and resist corrosion-wear. Here, a synergy between corrosion and wear takes place; wear is increased by the action of corrosion and corrosion is increased by the action of wear. In this paper, the corrosion response of SP700 (Ti-4.5A1-3V-2Fe-2Mo) and Ti-6A1-4V alloys, with and without surface treatments are described. Both kinds of alloy were surface-treated with: (i) an oxygen diffusion hardening process called "thermal oxidation" (TO) and (ii) a TiN coating procedure known as arc ion plating (AIP). The effect of prior mechanical (abrasive) surface damage on corrosion behaviour was simulated by scratching samples using a diamond indenter. A standard potentiodynamic or cyclic polarisation (CP) procedure, was conducted in de-aerated 0.89 wt.% NaCl (physiological saline) controlled at 37°C at a scan rate of 0.167 mV/s, from - 1V Ag/AgCl up to +4 V Ag/AgCl. Results showed that the TO-treated samples offered the best resistance to the sequential actions of mechanical damage (simulated abrasion) and corrosion. This is attributed to the TO-treatment producing a stable oxide layer, for both Ti-alloys, which displayed a superior repassivation rate and adhesive strength compared to untreated and TiN coated Ti-alloys. The TiN coated Ti-alloys were also prone to pitting and blistering during corrosion testing whilst the TO-treated alloys were not affected by blistering. However, the TO-treated Ti-6A1-4V showed evidence of superficial pitting. On balance, the TO-process appears to offer significant future promise for use in bio-implants and other engineering components subjected to corrosive-wear processes.

AB - During use, bio-implant materials like Ti-alloys need to endure and resist corrosion-wear. Here, a synergy between corrosion and wear takes place; wear is increased by the action of corrosion and corrosion is increased by the action of wear. In this paper, the corrosion response of SP700 (Ti-4.5A1-3V-2Fe-2Mo) and Ti-6A1-4V alloys, with and without surface treatments are described. Both kinds of alloy were surface-treated with: (i) an oxygen diffusion hardening process called "thermal oxidation" (TO) and (ii) a TiN coating procedure known as arc ion plating (AIP). The effect of prior mechanical (abrasive) surface damage on corrosion behaviour was simulated by scratching samples using a diamond indenter. A standard potentiodynamic or cyclic polarisation (CP) procedure, was conducted in de-aerated 0.89 wt.% NaCl (physiological saline) controlled at 37°C at a scan rate of 0.167 mV/s, from - 1V Ag/AgCl up to +4 V Ag/AgCl. Results showed that the TO-treated samples offered the best resistance to the sequential actions of mechanical damage (simulated abrasion) and corrosion. This is attributed to the TO-treatment producing a stable oxide layer, for both Ti-alloys, which displayed a superior repassivation rate and adhesive strength compared to untreated and TiN coated Ti-alloys. The TiN coated Ti-alloys were also prone to pitting and blistering during corrosion testing whilst the TO-treated alloys were not affected by blistering. However, the TO-treated Ti-6A1-4V showed evidence of superficial pitting. On balance, the TO-process appears to offer significant future promise for use in bio-implants and other engineering components subjected to corrosive-wear processes.

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KW - PVD

KW - Surface engineering

KW - Thermal oxidation

KW - TiN

KW - Titanium alloys

KW - TO-process

KW - Tribology

KW - Wear

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