Does distraction facilitate problem-focused coping with job stress? A 1 year longitudinal study

Akihito Shimazu, Wilmar B. Schaufeli

研究成果: Article

43 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

This study examined the sole and combined effects of problem-focused coping and distraction on employee well-being (i.e., stress responses and job performance) using two-wave panel survey data with a 1-year time lag. Participants were 488 male employees, who worked for a construction machinery company in western Japan. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine whether distraction moderates the relationship of problem-focused coping with well-being. More use of problem-focused coping was negatively related to subsequent stress responses among those high in distraction. The combination of high problem-focused coping and high distraction was positively related to subsequent job performance, although it was limited only to the high job stress situation. Results suggest that the combination of high problem-focused coping and high distraction may lead to lower stress responses and better performance (but only in high job stress situations for performance) than the combination of high problem-focused coping and low distraction, at least for male blue-collar workers.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)423-434
ページ数12
ジャーナルJournal of Behavioral Medicine
30
発行部数5
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2007 10 1
外部発表Yes

Fingerprint

Longitudinal Studies
Japan
Regression Analysis
Work Performance
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

これを引用

Does distraction facilitate problem-focused coping with job stress? A 1 year longitudinal study. / Shimazu, Akihito; Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

:: Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 巻 30, 番号 5, 01.10.2007, p. 423-434.

研究成果: Article

@article{550568c63218456c81b35b308b8a285f,
title = "Does distraction facilitate problem-focused coping with job stress? A 1 year longitudinal study",
abstract = "This study examined the sole and combined effects of problem-focused coping and distraction on employee well-being (i.e., stress responses and job performance) using two-wave panel survey data with a 1-year time lag. Participants were 488 male employees, who worked for a construction machinery company in western Japan. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine whether distraction moderates the relationship of problem-focused coping with well-being. More use of problem-focused coping was negatively related to subsequent stress responses among those high in distraction. The combination of high problem-focused coping and high distraction was positively related to subsequent job performance, although it was limited only to the high job stress situation. Results suggest that the combination of high problem-focused coping and high distraction may lead to lower stress responses and better performance (but only in high job stress situations for performance) than the combination of high problem-focused coping and low distraction, at least for male blue-collar workers.",
keywords = "Distraction, Longitudinal study, Performance, Problem-focused coping, Stress responses",
author = "Akihito Shimazu and Schaufeli, {Wilmar B.}",
year = "2007",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10865-007-9109-4",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "423--434",
journal = "Journal of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "0160-7715",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does distraction facilitate problem-focused coping with job stress? A 1 year longitudinal study

AU - Shimazu, Akihito

AU - Schaufeli, Wilmar B.

PY - 2007/10/1

Y1 - 2007/10/1

N2 - This study examined the sole and combined effects of problem-focused coping and distraction on employee well-being (i.e., stress responses and job performance) using two-wave panel survey data with a 1-year time lag. Participants were 488 male employees, who worked for a construction machinery company in western Japan. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine whether distraction moderates the relationship of problem-focused coping with well-being. More use of problem-focused coping was negatively related to subsequent stress responses among those high in distraction. The combination of high problem-focused coping and high distraction was positively related to subsequent job performance, although it was limited only to the high job stress situation. Results suggest that the combination of high problem-focused coping and high distraction may lead to lower stress responses and better performance (but only in high job stress situations for performance) than the combination of high problem-focused coping and low distraction, at least for male blue-collar workers.

AB - This study examined the sole and combined effects of problem-focused coping and distraction on employee well-being (i.e., stress responses and job performance) using two-wave panel survey data with a 1-year time lag. Participants were 488 male employees, who worked for a construction machinery company in western Japan. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine whether distraction moderates the relationship of problem-focused coping with well-being. More use of problem-focused coping was negatively related to subsequent stress responses among those high in distraction. The combination of high problem-focused coping and high distraction was positively related to subsequent job performance, although it was limited only to the high job stress situation. Results suggest that the combination of high problem-focused coping and high distraction may lead to lower stress responses and better performance (but only in high job stress situations for performance) than the combination of high problem-focused coping and low distraction, at least for male blue-collar workers.

KW - Distraction

KW - Longitudinal study

KW - Performance

KW - Problem-focused coping

KW - Stress responses

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34547640853&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34547640853&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10865-007-9109-4

DO - 10.1007/s10865-007-9109-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 17522973

AN - SCOPUS:34547640853

VL - 30

SP - 423

EP - 434

JO - Journal of Behavioral Medicine

JF - Journal of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 0160-7715

IS - 5

ER -