Experimental verification of factors influencing calcium salt formation based on a survey of the development of ceftriaxone-induced gallstone-related disorder

Rui Ito, Asami Yoshida, Kazuaki Taguchi, Yuki Enoki, Yuta Yokoyama, Kazuaki Matsumoto

研究成果: Article

抄録

Ceftriaxone (CTRX) forms salts with calcium (Ca) in the gall bladder and bile duct, and induces the formation of gallstones. In this study, factors of CTRX-induced gallstone formation were extracted from the results of a retrospective survey using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER), and the causal relationship between the factors and gallstone formation was investigated. From JADER, 136 patients who developed ‘gallstone-related disorder’ with CTRX as a suspected drug were extracted. The incidence of gallstone-induced adverse effects was high in patients treated with CTRX at a dose exceeding the normal daily dose and in children younger than 10 years old, suggesting that CTRX at a high level is a factor for gallstone formation. Thus, after mixing CTRX and Ca2+ at different concentrations under different pH condition, the number of particles in the solutions was measured using a Coulter counter. As a result, the number of minute particles significantly increased at all pH values when Ca2+ and CTRX were mixed at a concentration of 10 mEq/L or higher and 1.5 g/L or higher, respectively. At pH 6.5 or 7.0, visible crystals were detected when 25 mEq/L of Ca2+ and 2.0 g/L of CTRX were mixed. Based on these findings, attention should be sufficiently paid to the development of ‘gallstone-related disorder’ in pediatric patients and in patients treated with CTRX at a dose exceeding the normal dose. Furthermore, gallstone formation and growth may be promoted when CTRX and Ca2+ coexist at high concentrations under low pH conditions.

元の言語English
ジャーナルJournal of Infection and Chemotherapy
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2019 1 1

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Ceftriaxone
Gallstones
Salts
Calcium
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Surveys and Questionnaires
Bile Ducts
Urinary Bladder
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

これを引用

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title = "Experimental verification of factors influencing calcium salt formation based on a survey of the development of ceftriaxone-induced gallstone-related disorder",
abstract = "Ceftriaxone (CTRX) forms salts with calcium (Ca) in the gall bladder and bile duct, and induces the formation of gallstones. In this study, factors of CTRX-induced gallstone formation were extracted from the results of a retrospective survey using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER), and the causal relationship between the factors and gallstone formation was investigated. From JADER, 136 patients who developed ‘gallstone-related disorder’ with CTRX as a suspected drug were extracted. The incidence of gallstone-induced adverse effects was high in patients treated with CTRX at a dose exceeding the normal daily dose and in children younger than 10 years old, suggesting that CTRX at a high level is a factor for gallstone formation. Thus, after mixing CTRX and Ca2+ at different concentrations under different pH condition, the number of particles in the solutions was measured using a Coulter counter. As a result, the number of minute particles significantly increased at all pH values when Ca2+ and CTRX were mixed at a concentration of 10 mEq/L or higher and 1.5 g/L or higher, respectively. At pH 6.5 or 7.0, visible crystals were detected when 25 mEq/L of Ca2+ and 2.0 g/L of CTRX were mixed. Based on these findings, attention should be sufficiently paid to the development of ‘gallstone-related disorder’ in pediatric patients and in patients treated with CTRX at a dose exceeding the normal dose. Furthermore, gallstone formation and growth may be promoted when CTRX and Ca2+ coexist at high concentrations under low pH conditions.",
keywords = "Calcium, Ceftriaxone, Gallstone, JADER",
author = "Rui Ito and Asami Yoshida and Kazuaki Taguchi and Yuki Enoki and Yuta Yokoyama and Kazuaki Matsumoto",
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language = "English",
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T1 - Experimental verification of factors influencing calcium salt formation based on a survey of the development of ceftriaxone-induced gallstone-related disorder

AU - Ito, Rui

AU - Yoshida, Asami

AU - Taguchi, Kazuaki

AU - Enoki, Yuki

AU - Yokoyama, Yuta

AU - Matsumoto, Kazuaki

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Ceftriaxone (CTRX) forms salts with calcium (Ca) in the gall bladder and bile duct, and induces the formation of gallstones. In this study, factors of CTRX-induced gallstone formation were extracted from the results of a retrospective survey using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER), and the causal relationship between the factors and gallstone formation was investigated. From JADER, 136 patients who developed ‘gallstone-related disorder’ with CTRX as a suspected drug were extracted. The incidence of gallstone-induced adverse effects was high in patients treated with CTRX at a dose exceeding the normal daily dose and in children younger than 10 years old, suggesting that CTRX at a high level is a factor for gallstone formation. Thus, after mixing CTRX and Ca2+ at different concentrations under different pH condition, the number of particles in the solutions was measured using a Coulter counter. As a result, the number of minute particles significantly increased at all pH values when Ca2+ and CTRX were mixed at a concentration of 10 mEq/L or higher and 1.5 g/L or higher, respectively. At pH 6.5 or 7.0, visible crystals were detected when 25 mEq/L of Ca2+ and 2.0 g/L of CTRX were mixed. Based on these findings, attention should be sufficiently paid to the development of ‘gallstone-related disorder’ in pediatric patients and in patients treated with CTRX at a dose exceeding the normal dose. Furthermore, gallstone formation and growth may be promoted when CTRX and Ca2+ coexist at high concentrations under low pH conditions.

AB - Ceftriaxone (CTRX) forms salts with calcium (Ca) in the gall bladder and bile duct, and induces the formation of gallstones. In this study, factors of CTRX-induced gallstone formation were extracted from the results of a retrospective survey using the Japanese Adverse Drug Event Report (JADER), and the causal relationship between the factors and gallstone formation was investigated. From JADER, 136 patients who developed ‘gallstone-related disorder’ with CTRX as a suspected drug were extracted. The incidence of gallstone-induced adverse effects was high in patients treated with CTRX at a dose exceeding the normal daily dose and in children younger than 10 years old, suggesting that CTRX at a high level is a factor for gallstone formation. Thus, after mixing CTRX and Ca2+ at different concentrations under different pH condition, the number of particles in the solutions was measured using a Coulter counter. As a result, the number of minute particles significantly increased at all pH values when Ca2+ and CTRX were mixed at a concentration of 10 mEq/L or higher and 1.5 g/L or higher, respectively. At pH 6.5 or 7.0, visible crystals were detected when 25 mEq/L of Ca2+ and 2.0 g/L of CTRX were mixed. Based on these findings, attention should be sufficiently paid to the development of ‘gallstone-related disorder’ in pediatric patients and in patients treated with CTRX at a dose exceeding the normal dose. Furthermore, gallstone formation and growth may be promoted when CTRX and Ca2+ coexist at high concentrations under low pH conditions.

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