Gene transfer of drug resistance genes. Implications for cancer therapy

M. M. Gottesman, U. A. Germann, I. Aksentijevich, Yoshikazu Sugimoto, C. O. Cardarelli, I. Pastan, G. Schafer, B. E. Huber

研究成果: Article

40 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Two general approaches to the gene therapy of cancer have been proposed: (1) strategies that use exogenous genes to modify cancer cells so that they are less malignant or more susceptible to host defenses or to killing by exogenous agents; and (2) approaches that modify host cells so that they are more effective in eliminating cancer cells or more resistant to agents that are used to treat cancer. In both cases, the development of vectors that encode in vivo selectable phenotypes, such as drug resistance, would be extremely valuable because of the inherent inefficiency of gene transfer and the potential of such vectors to protect normal tissues against toxic agents. To allow the selection of cells in vivo that have been transduced with vectors for gene therapy, we have utilized the human multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene. The product of this gene is a 170,000-dalton glycoprotein known as P-glycoprotein, which acts as an energy-dependent efflux pump for a great many cytotoxic anticancer drugs, including doxorubicin, daunorubicin, etoposide, teniposide, actinomycin D, and taxol. Vectors encoding an MDR1 cDNA are able to transduce many cell types, including bone marrow cells, with high efficiency to allow selection of drug resistance in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Thus, it should be possible to protect the bone marrow of patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy by transduction of their hone marrow with MDR1 vectors. Furthermore, the ability to select for the presence of the MDR1 cDNA in vivo means that it can be used to introduce otherwise nonselectable genes into the bone marrow for therapy of cancer and other diseases.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)126-139
ページ数14
ジャーナルAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
716
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 1994
外部発表Yes

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Gene transfer
Drug Resistance
Genes
Gene therapy
Bone
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Bone Marrow
Cells
Neoplasms
Genetic Therapy
Complementary DNA
Teniposide
MDR Genes
Therapeutics
Daunorubicin
Chemotherapy
Poisons
P-Glycoprotein
Dactinomycin
Etoposide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

これを引用

Gottesman, M. M., Germann, U. A., Aksentijevich, I., Sugimoto, Y., Cardarelli, C. O., Pastan, I., ... Huber, B. E. (1994). Gene transfer of drug resistance genes. Implications for cancer therapy. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 716, 126-139. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1994.tb21708.x

Gene transfer of drug resistance genes. Implications for cancer therapy. / Gottesman, M. M.; Germann, U. A.; Aksentijevich, I.; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Cardarelli, C. O.; Pastan, I.; Schafer, G.; Huber, B. E.

:: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 巻 716, 1994, p. 126-139.

研究成果: Article

Gottesman, MM, Germann, UA, Aksentijevich, I, Sugimoto, Y, Cardarelli, CO, Pastan, I, Schafer, G & Huber, BE 1994, 'Gene transfer of drug resistance genes. Implications for cancer therapy', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 巻. 716, pp. 126-139. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1749-6632.1994.tb21708.x
Gottesman, M. M. ; Germann, U. A. ; Aksentijevich, I. ; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu ; Cardarelli, C. O. ; Pastan, I. ; Schafer, G. ; Huber, B. E. / Gene transfer of drug resistance genes. Implications for cancer therapy. :: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 1994 ; 巻 716. pp. 126-139.
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