Improvement of long-term blindness caused by compression from inner-third sphenoid wing meningioma after optic canal decompression: An extremely rare case report

Ryota Tamura, Satoshi Takahashi, Tomo Horikoshi, Kazunari Yoshida

研究成果: Article

2 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Background: There has been no previous case report of a patient whose visual acuity improved after long-term blindness caused by tumor invasion into the optic canal. Case Description: A 65-year-old Asian woman presented with a 6-month history of blindness caused by a meningioma located on the inner third of the sphenoid ridge. An operation was performed to prevent further tumor invasion into the cavernous sinus and contralateral optic nerve. During surgery, optic canal decompression was performed using an epidural approach. Subtotal removal of the tumor was achieved. Two days after the surgery, her left visual acuity recovered from blindness. Conclusion: Normally, long-term blindness caused by optic nerve compression by a brain tumor is regarded as irreversible, and even a surgical excision of the optic nerve is performed in some cases. However, because we experienced a case in which the patient recovered from long-term blindness after optic canal decompression, we believe that this surgical procedure should defnitely be considered as an option.

元の言語English
記事番号67
ジャーナルSurgical Neurology International
7
発行部数1
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2016 1 1

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Meningioma
Blindness
Decompression
Optic Nerve
Visual Acuity
Surgical Decompression
Neoplasms
Cavernous Sinus
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Brain Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

これを引用

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abstract = "Background: There has been no previous case report of a patient whose visual acuity improved after long-term blindness caused by tumor invasion into the optic canal. Case Description: A 65-year-old Asian woman presented with a 6-month history of blindness caused by a meningioma located on the inner third of the sphenoid ridge. An operation was performed to prevent further tumor invasion into the cavernous sinus and contralateral optic nerve. During surgery, optic canal decompression was performed using an epidural approach. Subtotal removal of the tumor was achieved. Two days after the surgery, her left visual acuity recovered from blindness. Conclusion: Normally, long-term blindness caused by optic nerve compression by a brain tumor is regarded as irreversible, and even a surgical excision of the optic nerve is performed in some cases. However, because we experienced a case in which the patient recovered from long-term blindness after optic canal decompression, we believe that this surgical procedure should defnitely be considered as an option.",
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AU - Takahashi, Satoshi

AU - Horikoshi, Tomo

AU - Yoshida, Kazunari

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N2 - Background: There has been no previous case report of a patient whose visual acuity improved after long-term blindness caused by tumor invasion into the optic canal. Case Description: A 65-year-old Asian woman presented with a 6-month history of blindness caused by a meningioma located on the inner third of the sphenoid ridge. An operation was performed to prevent further tumor invasion into the cavernous sinus and contralateral optic nerve. During surgery, optic canal decompression was performed using an epidural approach. Subtotal removal of the tumor was achieved. Two days after the surgery, her left visual acuity recovered from blindness. Conclusion: Normally, long-term blindness caused by optic nerve compression by a brain tumor is regarded as irreversible, and even a surgical excision of the optic nerve is performed in some cases. However, because we experienced a case in which the patient recovered from long-term blindness after optic canal decompression, we believe that this surgical procedure should defnitely be considered as an option.

AB - Background: There has been no previous case report of a patient whose visual acuity improved after long-term blindness caused by tumor invasion into the optic canal. Case Description: A 65-year-old Asian woman presented with a 6-month history of blindness caused by a meningioma located on the inner third of the sphenoid ridge. An operation was performed to prevent further tumor invasion into the cavernous sinus and contralateral optic nerve. During surgery, optic canal decompression was performed using an epidural approach. Subtotal removal of the tumor was achieved. Two days after the surgery, her left visual acuity recovered from blindness. Conclusion: Normally, long-term blindness caused by optic nerve compression by a brain tumor is regarded as irreversible, and even a surgical excision of the optic nerve is performed in some cases. However, because we experienced a case in which the patient recovered from long-term blindness after optic canal decompression, we believe that this surgical procedure should defnitely be considered as an option.

KW - Blindness

KW - Inner-third sphenoid wing meningioma

KW - Optic canal decompression

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