Lead induced increase of blood pressure in female lead workers

K. Nomiyama, H. Nomiyama, S. J. Liu, Y. X. Tao, T. Nomiyama, K. Omae

研究成果: Article

16 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Aims: Although lead exposure has, in the absence of mathematical modelling, been believed to elevate blood pressure in females, it is necessary to clarify the relation between lead and blood pressure by eliminating confounding factors in the analysis. Methods: Blood lead was measured in 193 female workers, including 123 lead exposed workers. Possible confounding factors were controlled by multiple regression analyses. Results and Conclusion: Blood lead above 40 μg/dl was found to be the most potent factor for elevating systolic/diastolic blood pressure. Aging, urine protein, and plasma triglyceride also contributed to systolic/diastolic/pulse pressure increase, but hypertensive heredity did not. Data suggested that lead induced changes in lipoprotein metabolism may play an important role in the lead induced blood pressure increase in female workers.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)734-738
ページ数5
ジャーナルOccupational and Environmental Medicine
59
発行部数11
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2002 11 1

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blood
Blood Pressure
Heredity
urine
multiple regression
Lead
Lipoproteins
Statistical Factor Analysis
metabolism
Blood Proteins
Triglycerides
plasma
Regression Analysis
Urine
protein
modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Environmental Science(all)

これを引用

Nomiyama, K., Nomiyama, H., Liu, S. J., Tao, Y. X., Nomiyama, T., & Omae, K. (2002). Lead induced increase of blood pressure in female lead workers. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 59(11), 734-738. https://doi.org/10.1136/oem.59.11.734

Lead induced increase of blood pressure in female lead workers. / Nomiyama, K.; Nomiyama, H.; Liu, S. J.; Tao, Y. X.; Nomiyama, T.; Omae, K.

:: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 巻 59, 番号 11, 01.11.2002, p. 734-738.

研究成果: Article

Nomiyama, K, Nomiyama, H, Liu, SJ, Tao, YX, Nomiyama, T & Omae, K 2002, 'Lead induced increase of blood pressure in female lead workers', Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 巻. 59, 番号 11, pp. 734-738. https://doi.org/10.1136/oem.59.11.734
Nomiyama, K. ; Nomiyama, H. ; Liu, S. J. ; Tao, Y. X. ; Nomiyama, T. ; Omae, K. / Lead induced increase of blood pressure in female lead workers. :: Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2002 ; 巻 59, 番号 11. pp. 734-738.
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