Self-efficacy and related factors related in Parkinson's disease patients

Chieko Fujii, T. Aoshima, S. Sato, N. Mori, N. Ohkoshi, S. Oda

研究成果: Article

7 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

This study was designed to assess self-efficacy and the factors leading to higher self-efficacy in Parkinson's disease patients, as measured by General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES). Questionnaires were mailed to patients with Parkinson's disease in Tokyo. This study surveyed 73 male and 70 female patients. Approximately 66.5% of the patients fell into the low self-efficacy group. Data was divided into 3 groups (high, moderate and low) and evaluated statistically. Approximately 66.5% of the patients fell into the low self-efficacy group. Patients in the high self-efficacy group exhibited the following features: Males: 1) The male patients in the high self-efficacy group tended to belong to more groups and had less trouble than any other groups in coping with their daily lives; 2) they generally had people to turn to for mental support outside their families, and for their daily life inside or outside their families; 3) they also felt confident that they had sufficient understanding of better life styles and how to exercise. Females: 1) The female patients in the high self-efficacy group tended to go out more often than any other groups and had places to go where they could practice hobbies and exercise; 2) they generally had people outside their families to turn to for mental support; 3) their subjective symptoms, such as freezing and dysarthria, tend to be less acute than in the moderate or low self-efficacy patients. 4) had les trouble than any other groups in coping with their housing accommodations; 5) they also felt confident that they understood how to exercise. In order to increase self-efficacy among Parkinson's disease patients, this study suggests that support, both social and psychological, and providing health education, are important.

元の言語English
ページ(範囲)817-826
ページ数10
ジャーナル[Nippon kōshū eisei zasshi] Japanese journal of public health
44
発行部数11
出版物ステータスPublished - 1997
外部発表Yes

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Self Efficacy
Parkinson Disease
Exercise
Hobbies
Dysarthria
Tokyo
Health Education
Freezing
Life Style
Psychology

これを引用

Self-efficacy and related factors related in Parkinson's disease patients. / Fujii, Chieko; Aoshima, T.; Sato, S.; Mori, N.; Ohkoshi, N.; Oda, S.

:: [Nippon kōshū eisei zasshi] Japanese journal of public health, 巻 44, 番号 11, 1997, p. 817-826.

研究成果: Article

Fujii, C, Aoshima, T, Sato, S, Mori, N, Ohkoshi, N & Oda, S 1997, 'Self-efficacy and related factors related in Parkinson's disease patients', [Nippon kōshū eisei zasshi] Japanese journal of public health, 巻. 44, 番号 11, pp. 817-826.
Fujii, Chieko ; Aoshima, T. ; Sato, S. ; Mori, N. ; Ohkoshi, N. ; Oda, S. / Self-efficacy and related factors related in Parkinson's disease patients. :: [Nippon kōshū eisei zasshi] Japanese journal of public health. 1997 ; 巻 44, 番号 11. pp. 817-826.
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