Short-term outcomes of laparoscopic repeat liver resection after open liver resection: a systematic review

Taiga Wakabayashi, Emanuele Felli, Riccardo Memeo, Pietro Mascagni, Yuta Abe, Yuukou Kitagawa, Patrick Pessaux

研究成果: Review article

抄録

Background: Laparoscopic repeat liver resection (LRLR) still represents a challenge for surgeons especially in case with previous open liver surgery. The aim of the study is to perform a systematic review of the current literature to investigate the feasibility of LRLR after open liver resection (OLR) for liver diseases. Methods: A computerized search was performed for all English language studies evaluating LRLR. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the short-term outcomes in comparative studies between LRLR with previous laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) and OLR. Results: From the initial 55 manuscripts, 8 studies including 3 comparative studies between LRLR after OLR and LLR were investigated. There was a total of 108 patients. Considering initial surgery, the extent of initial liver resection was major liver resection in 20% of patients in whom it was reported. In all the patients, the most frequent primary histology was hepatocellular carcinoma, followed by colorectal liver metastasis. A half of reported patients had severe adhesions at the time of LRLR. The median operative time for LRLR was ranged from 120 to 413 min and the median blood loss ranged from 100 to 400 mL. There were 11% of the patients conversions to open surgery, hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, or tumor ablation. The overall postoperative morbidity was 15% of all the patients, and there was no postoperative mortality. The median postoperative hospital stay was ranged from 3.5 to 10 days. The meta-analysis shows that LRLR after OLR is associated with a longer operative time and a more important blood loss compared to LRLR after LLR. However, no difference between LRLR after OLR and LLR was shown as far as hospital stay and morbidity rate are concerned. Conclusions: LRLR after OLR has been described in eight articles with favorable short-term outcomes in highly selected patients.

元の言語English
ジャーナルSurgical Endoscopy
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2019 1 1

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Liver
Operative Time
Meta-Analysis
Length of Stay
Hand-Assisted Laparoscopy
Conversion to Open Surgery
Morbidity
Manuscripts
Liver Diseases
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Histology
Language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

これを引用

Short-term outcomes of laparoscopic repeat liver resection after open liver resection : a systematic review. / Wakabayashi, Taiga; Felli, Emanuele; Memeo, Riccardo; Mascagni, Pietro; Abe, Yuta; Kitagawa, Yuukou; Pessaux, Patrick.

:: Surgical Endoscopy, 01.01.2019.

研究成果: Review article

Wakabayashi, Taiga ; Felli, Emanuele ; Memeo, Riccardo ; Mascagni, Pietro ; Abe, Yuta ; Kitagawa, Yuukou ; Pessaux, Patrick. / Short-term outcomes of laparoscopic repeat liver resection after open liver resection : a systematic review. :: Surgical Endoscopy. 2019.
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title = "Short-term outcomes of laparoscopic repeat liver resection after open liver resection: a systematic review",
abstract = "Background: Laparoscopic repeat liver resection (LRLR) still represents a challenge for surgeons especially in case with previous open liver surgery. The aim of the study is to perform a systematic review of the current literature to investigate the feasibility of LRLR after open liver resection (OLR) for liver diseases. Methods: A computerized search was performed for all English language studies evaluating LRLR. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the short-term outcomes in comparative studies between LRLR with previous laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) and OLR. Results: From the initial 55 manuscripts, 8 studies including 3 comparative studies between LRLR after OLR and LLR were investigated. There was a total of 108 patients. Considering initial surgery, the extent of initial liver resection was major liver resection in 20{\%} of patients in whom it was reported. In all the patients, the most frequent primary histology was hepatocellular carcinoma, followed by colorectal liver metastasis. A half of reported patients had severe adhesions at the time of LRLR. The median operative time for LRLR was ranged from 120 to 413 min and the median blood loss ranged from 100 to 400 mL. There were 11{\%} of the patients conversions to open surgery, hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, or tumor ablation. The overall postoperative morbidity was 15{\%} of all the patients, and there was no postoperative mortality. The median postoperative hospital stay was ranged from 3.5 to 10 days. The meta-analysis shows that LRLR after OLR is associated with a longer operative time and a more important blood loss compared to LRLR after LLR. However, no difference between LRLR after OLR and LLR was shown as far as hospital stay and morbidity rate are concerned. Conclusions: LRLR after OLR has been described in eight articles with favorable short-term outcomes in highly selected patients.",
keywords = "Laparoscopy, Previous open liver resection, Redo liver surgery, Repeat hepatectomy, Repeat liver resection, Short-term outcomes",
author = "Taiga Wakabayashi and Emanuele Felli and Riccardo Memeo and Pietro Mascagni and Yuta Abe and Yuukou Kitagawa and Patrick Pessaux",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Short-term outcomes of laparoscopic repeat liver resection after open liver resection

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Wakabayashi, Taiga

AU - Felli, Emanuele

AU - Memeo, Riccardo

AU - Mascagni, Pietro

AU - Abe, Yuta

AU - Kitagawa, Yuukou

AU - Pessaux, Patrick

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Laparoscopic repeat liver resection (LRLR) still represents a challenge for surgeons especially in case with previous open liver surgery. The aim of the study is to perform a systematic review of the current literature to investigate the feasibility of LRLR after open liver resection (OLR) for liver diseases. Methods: A computerized search was performed for all English language studies evaluating LRLR. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the short-term outcomes in comparative studies between LRLR with previous laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) and OLR. Results: From the initial 55 manuscripts, 8 studies including 3 comparative studies between LRLR after OLR and LLR were investigated. There was a total of 108 patients. Considering initial surgery, the extent of initial liver resection was major liver resection in 20% of patients in whom it was reported. In all the patients, the most frequent primary histology was hepatocellular carcinoma, followed by colorectal liver metastasis. A half of reported patients had severe adhesions at the time of LRLR. The median operative time for LRLR was ranged from 120 to 413 min and the median blood loss ranged from 100 to 400 mL. There were 11% of the patients conversions to open surgery, hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, or tumor ablation. The overall postoperative morbidity was 15% of all the patients, and there was no postoperative mortality. The median postoperative hospital stay was ranged from 3.5 to 10 days. The meta-analysis shows that LRLR after OLR is associated with a longer operative time and a more important blood loss compared to LRLR after LLR. However, no difference between LRLR after OLR and LLR was shown as far as hospital stay and morbidity rate are concerned. Conclusions: LRLR after OLR has been described in eight articles with favorable short-term outcomes in highly selected patients.

AB - Background: Laparoscopic repeat liver resection (LRLR) still represents a challenge for surgeons especially in case with previous open liver surgery. The aim of the study is to perform a systematic review of the current literature to investigate the feasibility of LRLR after open liver resection (OLR) for liver diseases. Methods: A computerized search was performed for all English language studies evaluating LRLR. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the short-term outcomes in comparative studies between LRLR with previous laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) and OLR. Results: From the initial 55 manuscripts, 8 studies including 3 comparative studies between LRLR after OLR and LLR were investigated. There was a total of 108 patients. Considering initial surgery, the extent of initial liver resection was major liver resection in 20% of patients in whom it was reported. In all the patients, the most frequent primary histology was hepatocellular carcinoma, followed by colorectal liver metastasis. A half of reported patients had severe adhesions at the time of LRLR. The median operative time for LRLR was ranged from 120 to 413 min and the median blood loss ranged from 100 to 400 mL. There were 11% of the patients conversions to open surgery, hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery, or tumor ablation. The overall postoperative morbidity was 15% of all the patients, and there was no postoperative mortality. The median postoperative hospital stay was ranged from 3.5 to 10 days. The meta-analysis shows that LRLR after OLR is associated with a longer operative time and a more important blood loss compared to LRLR after LLR. However, no difference between LRLR after OLR and LLR was shown as far as hospital stay and morbidity rate are concerned. Conclusions: LRLR after OLR has been described in eight articles with favorable short-term outcomes in highly selected patients.

KW - Laparoscopy

KW - Previous open liver resection

KW - Redo liver surgery

KW - Repeat hepatectomy

KW - Repeat liver resection

KW - Short-term outcomes

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U2 - 10.1007/s00464-019-06754-6

DO - 10.1007/s00464-019-06754-6

M3 - Review article

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AN - SCOPUS:85063219840

JO - Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques

JF - Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques

SN - 0930-2794

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