Studies on pathophysiology of PTSD using the SPS model

Kazuhisa Kohda, Kunio Kato, Nobumasa Kato

研究成果: Chapter

2 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Animal models are important tools for the study of pathophysiology and the developmentof new treatments for mental disorders. A number of animal models of posttraumaticstress disorder (PTSD) have been proposed, and these can be categorizedinto two major groups according to their basic concepts. One idea of model constructionis that stress given to animals should simulate traumatic events in humans.The researchers utilize social stress which is more naturalistic than electric shocksor restraint (Koolhaas et al. 1997). For example, animals are exposed to a predatoror predator odor and the alterations induced by the stress exposure are analyzed.Pathophysiological consequences of predator stress are described by Adamec inChap. 5.In the other animal models of PTSD, researchers focus on the alterations inducedby stress resembling symptoms of PTSD, although the stress paradigm itself is completelyartificial. As was reviewed by Foa et al. (1992), animals exposed to uncontrollableand unpredictable stress showed similar disturbances to those found in PTSD. Because pathogenesis of mental disorders is still unclear, most animal modelsare based on similarities in neurochemical, neurophysiological, or behavioralmanifestations between model animals and clinical observations. However, "facevalidity" is only the first step in establishing a model (Yehuda and Antelman 1993).Therefore, although animal research simplifies the investigation of possible pathophysiologyand molecular mechanisms of human diseases, confirmation in clinicalresearch is needed.

元の言語English
ホスト出版物のタイトルPTSD: Brain Mechanisms and Clinical Implications
出版者Springer Japan
ページ55-59
ページ数5
ISBN(印刷物)9784431295679, 4431295666, 9784431295662
DOI
出版物ステータスPublished - 2006
外部発表Yes

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pathophysiology
Animal Models
animal models
behavior disorders
Mental Disorders
animals
researchers
Research Personnel
predators
life events
animal research
human diseases
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
pathogenesis
odors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)

これを引用

Kohda, K., Kato, K., & Kato, N. (2006). Studies on pathophysiology of PTSD using the SPS model. : PTSD: Brain Mechanisms and Clinical Implications (pp. 55-59). Springer Japan. https://doi.org/10.1007/4-431-29567-4_6

Studies on pathophysiology of PTSD using the SPS model. / Kohda, Kazuhisa; Kato, Kunio; Kato, Nobumasa.

PTSD: Brain Mechanisms and Clinical Implications. Springer Japan, 2006. p. 55-59.

研究成果: Chapter

Kohda, K, Kato, K & Kato, N 2006, Studies on pathophysiology of PTSD using the SPS model. : PTSD: Brain Mechanisms and Clinical Implications. Springer Japan, pp. 55-59. https://doi.org/10.1007/4-431-29567-4_6
Kohda K, Kato K, Kato N. Studies on pathophysiology of PTSD using the SPS model. : PTSD: Brain Mechanisms and Clinical Implications. Springer Japan. 2006. p. 55-59 https://doi.org/10.1007/4-431-29567-4_6
Kohda, Kazuhisa ; Kato, Kunio ; Kato, Nobumasa. / Studies on pathophysiology of PTSD using the SPS model. PTSD: Brain Mechanisms and Clinical Implications. Springer Japan, 2006. pp. 55-59
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